Jack Leggett
Jack Leggett
Organization: Clemson University
Year: 2014 Inductee

In his 22 seasons, Jack Leggett led Clemson to 955 victories (43 per season), 21 NCAA Tournament appearances and six College World Series berths. Clemson was the seventh-winningest program in the nation during his time as head coach, while his six trips to Omaha tied for ninth most in the nation during his tenure.

The enthusiastic mentor did not build up that win total against easy competition. Of his 955 wins, 244 (26 percent) came against teams ranked in the top 25 of at least one of the three major polls. He also had 135 wins over top-10 teams, 68 victories in NCAA Tournament competition and directed Clemson to a winning record in ACC regular-season games in 21 of his 22 seasons in Tigertown.

Clemson's success was not limited to the long term, as the Tiger program was one of only 11 in the country that played in the NCAA Tournament each of the seven seasons from 2009-15.

The South Burlington, Vt. native was with the Tiger program from 1992-15. He served as recruiting coordinator and assistant head coach under Bill Wilhelm (1992,93). He was a major contributor to two teams that ranked in the final top 20 and reached an NCAA Regional. The Tigers also won the ACC Tournament title in 1993.

The word "championship" is also in the lexicon of terms when summarizing Leggett's 22 years as head coach in Tigertown. In 1994, Clemson won the ACC regular-season title and went on to win the tourney title as well. In 1995, the Tigers repeated as ACC regular-season champion and won the NCAA East Regional title.

The 1996 season brought Clemson another NCAA Regional title and a second consecutive berth to the College World Series. In 2006, the Tigers captured the Atlantic Division title with a 24-6 record and then won the ACC Tournament championship.

The Tigers also won regional titles in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010. Leggett guided Clemson to the College World Series in 2000, 2002, 2006 and 2010 as well.

Seven of the 22 years saw the Tigers finish in the top 10 of all three major polls, and there was at least one top-25 final ranking in 16 of 22 seasons under Leggett.

For his accomplishments, he was named ACC Coach-of-the-Year in his first two seasons (1994,95). He is one of a few coaches in ACC history, regardless of sport, to be named ACC Coach-of-the-Year in each of his first two seasons. He also earned the same honor in 2006 when Clemson won the ACC title.

Leggett, a member of the Western Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame and the University of Maine Hall of Fame, has 1,332 career wins and was the nation's fifth-winningest active Division I head coach at the end of the 2015 season. He reached the 1,300-win mark in Clemson's 3-2 walkoff win over No. 3 Miami (Fla.) in the ACC Tournament on May 22, 2014. In 2007, he became just the 29th coach in Division I history to reach 1,000 career wins.

Leggett has seven conference championships and 26 NCAA Tournament appearances on his resumé. A total of 121 players Leggett brought to Tigertown were drafted and/or signed a professional baseball contract.

Prior to his move to Clemson, Leggett served as a head coach for 14 years (five at Vermont, nine at Western Carolina). He already had 377 career wins, 302 at Western Carolina and 75 at Vermont, before he came to Clemson.

Leggett led Western Carolina to five NCAA Tournaments (1985-89), five SoCon titles and a top-30 ranking during his tenure as head coach. His 1988 team set the school record for wins, posting a 38-24 record, while the 1989 squad won its fifth-consecutive Southern Conference title. The Catamounts averaged 33 wins a season during his time in Cullowhee, N.C., and his teams played in the conference title game in eight of the nine seasons.

The 1991 Catamounts posted a 36-26 record. One of the 36 wins came in a 9-7 victory over Clemson on March 31, one of just 10 losses the No. 4 Tigers had that year. Leggett was named ABCA Atlantic Region Coach-of-the-Year and Southern Conference Coach-of-the-Year in 1987. In 1989, he was appointed to the NCAA Division I Baseball Committee and served on the committee through the 1995 season.

In his tenure at Western Carolina, Leggett produced 35 First-Team All-SoCon players, six conference players-of-the-year and had 16 players sign professional contracts. Of the Catamounts who played under him for four seasons, 100 percent graduated and more than 50 percent compiled a 3.0-or-better GPA. 

Before going to Western Carolina for the 1983 season, Leggett spent five seasons at Vermont, where he turned the program into a consistent winner. He coached the Vermont club team in 1977, then he organized and coached the school's first intercollegiate team in 1978. At age 23, Leggett was the youngest coach in the country. He had a winning season in his first year and had a 75-61 overall record at Vermont.

Leggett graduated with honors from Maine in 1976, where he was an all-star performer in baseball and football. He captained the 1976 Maine team that advanced to the College World Series, and he was a two-time All-Yankee Conference honoree in football as a defensive back and placekicker. He still holds the Maine record for the longest field goal (52).